Growing Up in Ireland

New Perspectives on Family Change in Ireland, General Information


 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Timetable for 11th and 12th December 
Timetable for 13th and 14th December
 
This two-day event took place on the 11th and 12th of December 2012, in Renehan Hall, South Campus, National University of Ireland, Maynooth. This event was funded by the Irish Research Council as part of the Family Rhythms Project at IQDA. 
 
During Tuesday and Wednesday contributions were made from a national assembly of experts from sociology, education, family research, social science research, social work and social policy, addressing aspects of the Irish family. The key note address, 'Family change, bricolage, and institutional leakage' was given by Prof. Simon Duncan, Professor of Comparative Social Policy at the University of Bradford. 
 
View speaker profiles
View all presentations
 
 
Students taking the Graduate Education Module 'New Perspectives on Family Change in Ireland' along with a group of postgraduate students from the School of Sociology at NUI Maynooth were back on Thursday morning for a series of talks on software for qualitive analysis and the All-Island Research Observatory. On Thursday afternoon students had a opportunity for hands on analysis of qualitative data that is distributed through IQDA. On Friday morning the Graduate Education Module students presented their own research, locating their work within the themes of the four day event. Postgraduate Module Information 
 
Topics included
• Trends in family change in Ireland over the last century
• Life-course perspectives on the family including contributions on childhood, young adulthood, parenthood and grandparenthood
• Keynote speech from Prof Simon Duncan on family change from an international perspective 
• Current research projects that are using Irish archival data to explore aspects the family  
• Introduction to two national archives, the Irish Qualitative Data Archive at NUI Maynooth, and the Irish Social Science Data Archive at UCD. 
 
In attendance: 
Postgraduate students, academics, researchers, staff from statutory and voluntary bodies and all those interested in research on the family and the reuse of archived data. View conference poster
 
Venue: 
The event took place in Renehan Hall, South Campus, NUI Maynooth. Where is Renehan Hall?
 
 
 

Publications from archived GUI data

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Young grandchildren and their grandparents:  a secondary analysis of continuity and change across four birth cohorts
 
Journal: Families, Relationships and Societies, Vol 2, No. 2, (2013) pp. 289 - 98. 
PRINT ISSN 2046-7435
ONLINE ISSN 2046-7443
 
Keywords: grandparents as carers, Life Histories and Social Change, Growing Up in Ireland, secondary analysis, intergenerational relationships, co-residence 
 
Authors: Jane Gray (jane.gray[at]nuim.ie), Ruth Geraghty; David Ralph. 
 
Abstract: This article examines the changing texture of intergenerational relationships in Ireland. Focusing on the young child as ‘anchor’ generation, we traced changes in the quality and significance of grandchild–grandparent relationships across four birth cohorts, through a secondary analysis of two major qualitative longitudinal datasets made available by the Irish Qualitative Data Archive. The article describes how we addressed the challenges associated with bringing these datasets into dialogue.
 
 
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Spending Time with Family and Friends: Children’s Views on Relationships and Shared Activities
 
Journal: Child Indicators Research, Volume 5, Number 3 (2012), pp. 449-467. 
DOI: 10.1007/s12187-012-9158-2
 
Keywords: Children’s views, Family and peer relationships, Activities, Time, Bullying
 
Authors: Colette McAuley (C.McAuley[at]bradford.ac.uk); Caroline McKeown; Brian Merriman
 
Abstract: Sociologists of childhood have stressed the importance of children’s experience in the present and children as agents who actively construct their own lives and influence relationships with family and friends. Current thinking in the field of child well-being emphasises the need to consult children as experts in their own lives. Findings from research with children have led to important insights about what contributes to well-being. Relationships with family and friends have been found to be central to well-being whilst bullying by peers deeply impacts on their well-being. Shared activities appear to be the context for children to not only master competences but also learn about and negotiate relationships. The Growing Up in Ireland interviews with 9 year old children were re-analysed with a view to exploring these crucial domains and how they impact on the children’s well-being. The children were found to have a wide circle of family connections and were particularly close to their mothers although also close to their fathers. Grandparents played a significant role in their lives and their relationships with siblings were often positive but did fluctuate. Reasons for closeness centred around trust. Lack of availability due to work was a key contributor to children feeling less close to a family member. The children were involved in a wide range of structured activities after school and at the weekend, This was usually balanced with free time although some ‘hurried’ children had frenetic lifestyles. Involvement in unstructured activities such as free play was particularly associated with time with friends and choice. Friendship was characterised by sharing and trust. On the other hand, bullying by peers had been experienced by many of the children and almost all were conscious of the danger of becoming bullied. The wider issues of work-family balance and its impact on children, the predominance of bullying and children’s right to be heard are reflected upon.
 
 

GUI Community Page


 
The IQDA provides a space for researchers and academics across numerous organisations to share information and experiences of using the Growing Up in Ireland qualitative data.
 
View Recent Publications from archived GUI qualitative data. 
 
Below is a list of current projects that are using the Growing Up in Ireland qualitative dataset that is archived at IQDA
 
 
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Working out? Family strategies in household employment and childcare and the impact on child wellbeing

 
Commencement: 2012 
 
Lead Researcher: Catriona O'Toole, Education Department NUIM (profile
 
Institution: National University of Ireland, Maynooth
 
Project Description: This study will involve an evalutation of wellbeing of children from families where the parents are working and where the children are minded by others (relaitves/ neighbours/ paid carers)
 
 
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Digital childhood

Supported by the Irish Research Council for Humanities and Social Sciences

Lead Researcher: Dr. Brian O'Neill, IRCHSS Senior Research Fellow, The Centre for Social and Educational Research (CSER), DIT Mountjoy Square (profile)

Other Researcher(s): Dr. Thuy Dinh, Post-doctoral researcher, The Centre for Social and Educational Research (CSER), DIT Mountjoy Square (profile)

Institution: Dublin Institute of Technology, Mountjoy Square

More info:http://www.dit.ie/cser/cserexpertise/digitalchildhoods/

Project Description: This research theme studies the role of information and communication technologies in contemporary childhood, examining the diverse array of opportunities for new modes of learning and socialization as well as risks posed for children and young people in Ireland today.

The aim of this project is to enhance our knowledge of digital childhoods from an Irish standpoint. Building on the 2010 EU Kids Online survey of children’s use of the internet, this project will consolidate and develop new research findings about Irish children’s digital experience within a comparative European framework. The project will develop a critical analysis of current data on childhood, ICTs, opportunity and risk in Ireland and augment existing quantitative data with new qualitative focus group studies on children’s understanding of internet opportunities and risks.   The research will provide a policy assessment of educational, e-inclusion, safety, and privacy dimensions of ICT use and will incorporate stakeholder engagement and guides to policy action in education, digital literacy and ICT regulation.
 
 
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An exploration of patterns of 'paternal involvement' in children's lives

Commencement: 2012

Lead Researcher: Dr. Michael Rush, UCD School of Applied Social Science (profile)

Other Researcher(s): Prof Tony Fahey, UCD School of Applied Social Science (profile), Louise Creagh, UCD School of Applied Social Science

Institution: Univeristy College Dublin

Project Description: This project proposes to utilize a mixed methodology to analyze patterns of paternal involvement in children's lives. With a focus on the child's perceptions of 'paternal involvement'.
 
 
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The Relationship Between Educational Experiences of Young Irish Students and Their Physical Wellbeing

Commencement: 2012

Lead Researcher: Dr. Ann MacPhail, Department of Physical Education and Sport Sciences (profile)

Institution: University of Limerick

Project Description: To extend and com
pliment the recently published 'Influences on 9-Year-Olds Learning' by introducing and interrogating children and parents in-depth data, particular to young people's physical well-being.
 
 
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Children's Wellbeing - Multi-stakeholder Perspective
 
Commencement: 2012
 
Lead Researcher: Dr. Sinead Hanafin
 
 
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Educational attainment of young people in Ireland
 
Commencement: 2012
 
Lead Researcher: Dr. Delma Byrne, Department of Sociology, NUI Maynooth (profile)
 
Institution: National University of Ireland, Maynooth
 
 
Project Description: The data will be used to explore a range of issues relating to the educational attainment of young people in Ireland, alongside the quantitiative dimension of the study. Specifically, the data will be used to explain variation in educational attainment among 9 year old males and females. In doing so, the main goals of the research are to consider how educational attainment varies across individuals, schools and regions in Ireland and to consider the key influences on the educational attainment of 9 year olds in Ireland. In doing so the proposed research seeks to contribute to wider objectives of the GUI study, namely 'to identify the persistent adverse effects that lead to social disadvantage and exclusion, educational difficulites, ill health and deprivation' and to 'provide evidence for the creation of effective response policies and services for children and their families'.
 
 
 
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'Till Death Us Do Part' Marital Breakdown in Modern Society
 
Commencement: 2012
 
Lead Researcher: Dr. Sara O'Sullivan, UCD School of Sociology (profile)
 
Other Researcher(s): Eileen Nagle, UCD School of Sociology
 
Institution: University College Dublin
 
 
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Family Rhythms
Commencement: 2012

Lead Researcher: Dr. Jane Gray, Department of Sociology, NUI Maynooth (profile)

Other Researcher(s): Dr. David Ralph, NIRSA, NUI Maynooth, Ruth Geraghty, NIRSA, NUI Maynooth

Institution: National University of Ireland, Maynooth

Project Description: The Family Rhythms project aims to re-vision family change in modern Ireland in light of recent theoretical developments, through an in-depth analysis of newly available qualitative data resources held in the Irish Qualitative Data Archive including Growing Up in Ireland. The research will examine changes in the textures, meanings and rhythms of family life in order to develop an understanding of the processes underlying changing demographic structures, to be reported in a state-of-the-art textbook.The research has been funded by a Government of Ireland Senior Research Fellowship from the Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences.
 
 
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Family Well-Being in Difficult Times: A Model of Factors Influencing the Well-Being of Families on Limited Incomes in Ireland

Commencement: 2012

Lead Researcher: Dr. Lorraine Swords, Children's Research Centre, TCD (profile)

Other Researcher(s): Brian Merriman, Children's Research Centre, TCD

Institution: Trinity College Dublin

Project Description: This projecrt aims to investigate how limited family income can influence key family well-being measures using data collected as part of Growing Up in Ireland, the National Longitudinal Study of Children.
 
 
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Exhibition for 50th Anniversary of Psychology at TCD, at the Science Gallery

Commencement: 2012

Lead Researcher: Dr. Elizabeth Nixon, School of Psychology, TCD (profile)

Institution: Trinity College Dublin

Project Description: The School of Psychology in TCD is celebrating its 50th Anniversary and as part of the celebration is hosting an exhibition at the Science Gallery. As GUI has been conducted at the Children's Research Centre, which is part of the School of Psychology, we would like to showcase soem of the qualitiative findings, as the theme of the exhibition is 'Happy'.
 
 
 
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Children and inclusion/exclusion in contemporary Ireland

Commencement: 2011

Lead Researcher: Dr. Caitriona Ni Laoire, Institute for Social Sciences in 21st Century, UCC (profile)

Institution: University College Cork

Project Description: Background research on children's experiences of inclusion and exclusion in difference contexts
 
 
 
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Spending Time with Family and Friends: Children’s Views on Relationships and Shared Activities

Commencement: 2011

Lead Researcher: Prof Colette McAuley, UCD School of Applied Social Sciences (profile)

Other Researcher(s): Caroline McKeown, UCD School of Applied Social Sciences

Institution: University College Dublin
 
 
 
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Sample data for Illustration at Summer School in Cork, 13th Sept 2011

Commencement: 2011

Lead Researcher: Dr. Jane Gray, Department of Sociology, NUI Maynooth (profile)

Institution: National University of Ireland, Maynooth

Project Description: Data was presented at IRCHSS funded UCC Summer School 2011 at University College Cork, to provide samples on accessing and using qualitative data on childhood and children.
 
 
 
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Family Relationships and Family Well-Being

Commencement: 2011

Lead Researcher: Dr. Patricia Keilthy, Social Science Research Centre, UCD

Other Researcher(s): Dr. Ela Polek, Social Science Research Centre, UCD

Institution: University College Dublin

Project Description: This study will examine relational well-being in the families of nine year-old children in Ireland, viewed in the context of a comprehensive analysis of factors relevant to family well-being as measured int he first wave of data on the nine year old sample from the Growing Up in Ireland study. The study will focus especially on five inter-related issues: (1) the intactness of couple relationships since first formation; (2) the inter-personal quality of couple relationships; (3) the links between the intactness and quality of the couple relationships and the individual well-being of parents; (4) the quality of partents' relationship with children , as reported both by parents and children; (5) a comprehensive modeling of child well-being, with reference especially to links with the factors examined in (1) and (4). An underlying concern of the study will be to examine inequalities between families in the various dimensions of well-being, explore the inter-linkages between these dimensions of inequality and locate them in the context of inequalities in income and living standards, education, social class, ethnicity and gender in Irish society. The study aims to contribute both to the development of policy on family support in Ireland and to international academic research on family dynamics, particularly in regard to the interaction between family inequalities and broader social inequalities.
 
 
 
 

 

 

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